3 STEPS TO SMOOTHER BALER OPERATION

Troubleshooting and Preventative Care for Large Square Balers

by Spencer Whitlow & David Burns


INTRODUCTION

In the following paper we discuss three simple, easy methods to ensure your baler operates up to its potential, provide guidelines for diagnosing common bottlenecks, and offer recommendations to extend the operational life of your large square baler.

STEP 1: MAINTAIN APPROPRIATE LUBRICATION

Ensuring proper levels of lubrication is essential for smooth operation. Appropriate greasing will keep your baler functioning with the trouble-free efficiency for which it was designed. Insufficient lubrication can result in premature wear, leading to costly repairs and shortening the life of your machine. Over-lubrication can result in slippage, sub-optimal performance, and premature failure.

Following a greasing routine prior to beginning each day’s work requires only a minor investment of time. Further, this practice provides an excellent opportunity to examine the state of your baler, observe any changes that may have taken place, and discover potential problems early.

STEP 2: WHEN THE BALER MIS-TIES OR THROWS A FLAG

The knotter system is responsible for ensuring the consistent production of compact, securely tied bales. From time to time manual intervention will be required to bring the system back to a working condition. Such a state may manifest in the form of loose or mis-tied bales, or in a raised flag and an alarm. A straightforward protocol exists for assessing and correcting this situation (download complete paper for protocol).

STEP 3: KEEP THE STUFFER CHAMBER DOOR CLEAN

In the course of running your large square baler, debris may gather in the stuffer chamber door. This will be especially common in fields possessed of a substantial fraction of dirt and rocks. As this accumulation occurs, it will lead to the door becoming jammed down, followed by a lack of pre-compression and continuous stuffing. Often, an alarm will alert the operator to this condition, but improperly formed bales can result before that critical point has been reached. A simple visual inspection in the morning can illuminate this issue before it becomes a problem. Whether a clogged stuffer door is detected early or whether a mid-operation work stoppage has forced action, the procedure for cleaning is the same (Download complete paper for procedure).

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